6 Fun, Preschool Math Activities

6 Fun, Preschool Math Activities

 6 Fun, Preschool Math Activities

Math doesn’t have to be intimidating. In fact, it can actually be fun, and these six activities can help you introduce your child to many different concepts including counting, sorting, patterns, and geometric shapes. Ready to get started? Enlist the help of food, stuffed animals, socks, and more.

1. Count with food.

Snack time, dinner time, lunch-prep time — any time works for counting food! Ask your child to put five baby carrots and five apple slices on a plate for snack. Have your child add three meatballs to each family member’s dinner plate of spaghetti. And when it’s time to get tomorrow’s lunch ready, take out two containers or bags and ask your child to put two graham crackers in one, and eight cubes of cheese in the other.

2. Sort stuffed animals into groups.

What do Bob the bear and Harry the horse have in common? They’re both brown! Help your child sort stuffed animals into different groups. First, sort by color. Then, encourage your child to think about where different animals live in the wild, and sort by habitat. You can also sort by number of legs, size, tail vs. no tail, pointy ears vs. floppy ears, and more.

3. Create patterns.

Use colored blocks, plastic bears, or other small items to introduce your child to the concept of patterns. Have your child make a pile of red blocks while you make a pile of yellow. Then, lay a yellow one down on the table, ask your child to follow with red, and repeat. Explain the yellow, red, yellow, red sequence to your child and switch it up with other colors. Once you’ve got the basics down, you can move on to something a little harder, such as yellow, yellow, red, yellow, yellow, red.

4. Match socks.

Fun Preschool Math ActivitiesDo you dread the laundry-day sock pile? Ask your child to help you find each sock’s match. If you need to simplify it, start by dividing the socks into smaller piles based on who wears them. As your child goes through each pile, there might be four blue socks that look pretty similar or a slew of black socks with barely-noticeable differences. Point out the polka dots on a blue sock or draw attention to the grey stripes on a black sock…and ask your child to find the ones that match. Fun Preschool Math Activities

5. Go on a shape hunt around the house and outside.

Work with your child to draw a circle, oval, square, rectangle, triangle, diamond, star, and heart on a sheet of paper. Then, walk around your house, the backyard, the neighborhood, or a nearby park and look for these shapes in different rooms, on street signs, on houses and buildings, and in nature — and make sure to name each shape as you go.

6. Use measuring cups and spoons in the kitchen.

Fun Preschool Math ActivitiesOn your mark, get set, bake! Not only is cooking fun, it’s educational and usually results in something delicious. Start with a simple recipe, such as bread, pizza dough, cookies, or soup. Read the recipe out loud and talk about the different measurements. When it’s time to add one cup of flour or one teaspoon of salt, help your child pick out the right measuring cup and spoon and fill them up.

Whether you want to build on a concept your child is learning in preschool, your child has started asking about different shapes, or you simply need interesting ideas you can turn to during downtime, take advantage of these math activities you can do at home.

 

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Click here and enjoy this video: Counting with Lids!

Click here for many videos for you and your child to play at home!

3 Things to Prepare for When Transitioning to the Toddler Classroom

3 Things to Prepare for When Transitioning to the Toddler Classroom

3 Things to Prepare for When Transitioning to the Toddler Classroom

Adapted from The Family Room

 

So, the day arrived when our son was finally ready to start transitioning to the toddler classroom from the infant classroom. At first, this was exciting news, as it was a big step for him developmentally. The teachers in his classroom carefully helped us plan the move, taking into consideration his physical development and what was safest for him. Then the transition visits began… and new emotions hit me like never. Here are the three biggest changes that threw me for a loop in the beginning.

3 Things to Prepare for When Transitioning to the Toddler ClassroomThe Nerves…

I did not expect to be so nervous about moving classes. The preschools allowed for transition visits. It was very important and comforting for me when my son was transitioning to the toddler classroom. I loved that these visits allowed him to be in the new classroom on certain days for an hour or two before he was there full-time. What I did not expect, was that these transition visits would hit me so hard. I wanted to make sure that when he was sad, I could help him. It was super helpful was the reassurance from his teachers. They told me that all of these emotions were normal. They gave me thorough updates throughout the day. The teachers also gave me the best advice leading up to the big transition day.

Lunch and Outdoor Play Prep

Suddenly, our nighttime prep for the next day changed dramatically! We went from packing just extra clothes, bottles, diapers, and snacks to a totally new routine. Outdoor play meant shopping 3 Things to Prepare for When Transitioning to the Toddler Classroomfor appropriate clothes. For lunch time we now needed a lunchbox with ice packs. There was something about a one-year-old with a lunchbox that made me feel like we were sending him off to college.

Goodbye Daytime Crib!

Nap time in the toddler classroom meant mats and not cribs and I was nervous that my son wouldn’t be able to nap. It was a huge relief to know that nap time went well and that he apparently he didn’t need a crib any longer during the day. My fears of a fatigued one-year-old were totally unnecessary, as he adapted very well.

I’m so happy that my son made a good transition. He was happy and so was I.

Click here to watch a great video on successful and healthy preschool transitioning

Want to read the original article? Click here

6 Science Podcasts for Kids

6 Science Podcasts for Kids

6 Science Podcasts for Kids

Adapted from Bright Horizons

“Why is the sky blue?”  

“What is that plant called?”

“How can birds fly?”

“How hot is the sun?”

Sound familiar? You probably have a curious child on your hands…and you might be flooded with more science-y questions than you can answer. Let podcasts for kids help! Whether you and your child have a long commute, you’re looking for an educational weekend activity, or you simply want an alternative to screen or TV time, try these six science podcasts for kids.

ScienceBrains On

This award-winning podcast aims to encourage children’s natural curiosity of science by exploring many different topics. Co-hosted by Molly Bloom and a different child each week, Brains On features over 100 episodes and values listener participation. You can even submit your child’s questions for a chance to be added to the Brains Honor Roll. Past episode topics include fire vs. lasers, roller coasters, soil, salty snacks, cats, and how books are made and how we read them.

WOW in the World

NPR’s “podcast for curious kids and their grown-ups” dives into the “Who, What, When, Where, Why, How, and Wow in the World” of a variety of science and technology topics. WOW in the World co-hosts Guy Raz and Mindy Thomas cover something different each week — past topics range from how recess makes kids smarter, to stress-relieving video games, to cockroaches, and more.

Tumble

This science podcast for kids is designed for the whole family. Tumble co-hosts Lindsay Patterson and Marshall Escamilla focus on how science works, tell fascinating stories about scientific sciencediscoveries. For example, the STEM program that we have at A Children’s Carousel. Additionally, they teach things that go beyond what is taught in school. Recent episodes include “Hamster Versus Bacteria” and “Discover the Wildlife of Your Home.”

But Why

Here’s another NPR podcast for kids, but this one is led by kids, too. Each episode is based on children’s questions — and you and your child can even submit your own! Here are a few recent questions that host Jane Lindholm has covered: “Why do elephants have trunks? Why do giraffes have purple tongues?” “Why do days start at 12 o’clock?” and “Why do we sometimes see the moon during the day?”

The Show About Science

Not only is this a family friendly podcast  –  it is a second grader! In the Show About Science, Nate Butkus interviews a variety of guests — scientists, educators, and more — to explore fascinating topics, which, in the past, have included climate change, fake sugar, ants, food science, and sea creatures.

ScienceFun Kids Science Weekly

This science podcast for kids is produced in the UK — and it’s another one with the submit-your-child’s-question format. Each week, host Dan covers weird, cool topics that pique children’s curiosity. There’s something for everyone: from lonely frogs, flower urchins, and the T-rex of the ocean, to fire mountain, the secret life of antelopes, and the future of robots, and much more.

The next time your child stumps you with a question about science or you’re simply looking for an educational change of pace, check out these six podcasts together. Chances are you’ll both learn something new.

Click here  to read the original article

 

 

Click here to listen to a fabulous science podcast hosted by second grader Nate Butkus. There is no limit to what a child can achieve!

4 Ways to Make Holidays Better for Kids

4 Ways to Make Holidays Better for Kids

4 Ways to Make Holidays Better for Kids

Tips for keeping kids happy and able to enjoy the fun

Rachel Ehmke; Adapted from Child Mind Institute

4 Ways to Make Holidays Better for KidsIt’s easy for children to be smitten with the magic of the holidays. Fun presents. Extra sweets. A vacation from school—there’s a lot to like. But with the freedom and excess of the season, sometimes kids can get a little carried away. For most families, there will be a point when the kids get overtired and cranky, or greedy about presents. Or would rather play a video game than talk to Grandma. Here are some tips to keep kids happy and ready to enjoy whatever the season brings.

1. Gifts, gifts, gifts: Getting presents is a high point of the holidays for any kid, but they shouldn’t be the only focus. As adults we know that 4 Ways to Make Holidays Better for Kidsgiving presents can be just as rewarding as getting them. We shouldn’t wait to teach that lesson to our children. Even when kids are too young to buy a present, they can still make one. Or help you pick out something. Some of my best holiday memories are of helping my father look for the perfect gift for Mom. Also, combing the mall to look for presents with my siblings as we got older.

Volunteering, participating in a local toy drive, or giving each of your kids a little money to give to a charity of their choice. These are all great ideas for getting children in a more generous mood. Also, remember that the best gifts that you give your children probably won’t be the material ones. Take time for the whole family to get together to play a game, watch a movie, or decorate sugar cookies. These are the things that kids remember as they get older.

2. Let them help: There’s a lot of extra work to do around the holidays like putting up decorations, cooking big dinners, throwing parties. The Martha Stewart in all of us can take over, but it’s important to take a step back and make sure our kids are included.

Children can help set the table, decorate the house, and wrap presents. If they’re too young to wrap, they can help by holding down the paper or getting the tape ready. There’s always something kids can do. And at holiday time, the preparations are often as fun and as meaningful as the end product. Plus, this way kids won’t feel left out or be glued to the iPad for hours.

3. Keep routines: We love the holidays because they give us a break from the everyday. However, that can also make them stressful, especially for kids who find routine comforting. Try to keep some things constant. Kids still need snack time. They still need special attention from you. They still need a chance to unwind before bedtime.

4 Ways to Make Holidays Better for Kids At family gatherings when they notice the kids are “getting antsy,” psychologist Rachel Busman says she and her sister did the following. They would give them their baths, get them into pajamas, and turn on a movie. “We know when they need to wind down, we won’t be judged for excusing ourselves from the table to do these things,” she says.

4. Remember they’re kids: Some holiday traditions depend on kids being on their best behavior. For example, lengthy services, parties with lots of strangers, elaborate meals. These meals may not appeal to picky eaters. Try to keep those to a minimum and customize festivities for your kids’ frustration level. Don’t schedule more than one demanding event in a day. Make sure to include physical activity and plenty of downtime. Your kids will be grateful — and so will you.

Click here to read the original article.

Click here  to watch Dr. Deborah Gilboa give advice on how to make your child happy during the holidays without spoiling them too much.

Toddler Lunch Ideas

Toddler Lunch Ideas

New ideas for sandwiches, wraps, mini-pizzas and more tasty lunch recipes for kids

Adapted from Parenting.com by Jennifer Saltiel, Stephanie Eckelkamp and Kelly Ladd Sanchez

Enjoy these yummy and simple lunch recipes!

 

Honey, Almond Butter & BananaToddler Lunch Ideas
Spread 2 slices of whole-wheat bread with almond butter or peanut butter.  Top 1 bread slice with a drizzle of honey (for kids 1 and up) and a layer of banana slices. Cover with the other slice, butter side down.

 

 

Toddler Lunch Ideas

Pear & Avocado
Mash 1/2 ripe avocado in a bowl. Add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Spread the avocado evenly on 2 slices of sourdough bread. Add a layer of thinly sliced Bosc or Asian pear to 1 bread slice. Cover with the other slice and press gently to adhere. Swap in pomegranate seeds for the pear, if you like.

 

   

                               Tuna Pasta Salad

Toddler Lunch IdeasMix whatever shaped cooked pasta you like with some mixed veggies. Once it’s cooked mix in some tinned tuna or other fish, a drizzle of olive oil and some dried oregano – serve it hot or cold. Delicious and so simple!

 

 

 

Toddler Lunch IdeasStrawberry & Goat Cheese
Split an English muffin and lightly toast the halves. Spread each half with softened goat cheese or plain whipped cream cheese. Top with a thin layer of strawberry jam, followed by a layer of thin strawberry slices. Place the top half of the muffin over the bottom half and press gently.

 

 

Toddler Lunch IdeasSlice It Right
If it seems like that sandwich you packed in the morning makes a soggy return uneaten in the afternoon, swap in Pepperidge Farm Goldfish—shaped bread. It’ll remind him of a familiar snack and get him to eat up. $3 to $4; grocery stores.

 

 

Toddler Lunch IdeasTurkey Pinwheels 
Spread dollop of store-bought hummus on whole-wheat tortilla, then layer a slice of turkey and some spinach leaves. Roll up and cut.

 

 

Toddler Lunch IdeasPita-Butter and Jelly
If your child’s main food staple is PB&J, but peanut butter is a no-no at her school, here’s a peanut-free option. Substitute butter or cream cheese in for peanut butter and spread on whole-wheat pita bread. Top with jelly, or if she loves apple pie, try cinnamony apple butter.

 

 

Toddler Lunch IdeasI Heart Turkey
A plain ol’ turkey sandwich gets a little love with this Thanksgiving-inspired, heart-shaped version. (Kid not a heart-lover? Stars or dinosaur shapes work, too.) Spread a thin layer of cranberry sauce on two pieces of whole wheat bread. Layer two slices of roasted turkey breast and sliced cheese. Use a cookie cutter to cut the sandwich into the shape of a heart.

 

 

Toddler Lunch IdeasMini Pizzas
This kid-favorite gets a healthy makeover to fuel your child’s busy body all day long. Make these the night before to save time in the morning. Top English muffin halves with jarred marinara sauce (if your child won’t object, add chopped steamed broccoli or spinach to the sauce.) Sprinkle pre-shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese on top. Bake at 350 degrees for 5 minutes. Let cool, then wrap up.

 

 

Toddler Lunch IdeasBrunch for Lunch
Who says French toast and eggs are just for breakfast? This traditional morning meal makes a power-packed lunch. Feel free to make these the night before. French toast cinnamon sticks: Add pureed squash or sweet potatoes to egg-milk batter for an extra boost of beta-carotene. Cook French toast and sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar mixture. Let cool and slice into sticks for an easy-to-eat fork-free option.

 

Click here to read the original article.

Mindfulness Practice for Preschoolers Connecting Kids to Nature

Mindfulness Practice for Preschoolers Connecting Kids to Nature

Mindfulness Practice for Preschoolers Mindfulness Practice for Preschoolers Connecting Kids to Nature

by: Scott Rogers – Adapted from Mindful Magazine, 2017

We live in a time when it is all too easy to feel stressed and overwhelmed, and even children are more frequently

experiencing these uncomfortable states. 

When we teach mindfulness to children, we are sharing with them skillful ways of relating to life’s uncomfortable and challenging moments. The earlier we do so in their young lives, the greater the opportunity to help them cultivate  resilience as they mature.                                                                                                                                                                             

Mindfulness Practice for Preschoolers, is an approach of sharing mindfulness that draws on the elements of nature. Often, we reflect on the beauty and serenity of the natural world out there and overlook our own beautiful nature. This exercise introduces children to ways of seeing the strength and beauty of nature within themselves, offering a short practice to help relax and observe their experience.

When we go outside we can see and feel so many wonderful things. Things like trees, and the wind, and the clouds, and the sun. Mindfulness Practice for Preschoolers

In many ways we are like these beautiful parts of nature.

Here is a mindfulness practice for preschoolers. It is an exercise that teachers and parents can practice with their students/children. Please enjoy video clip of your children practicing mindfulness below! 

Mindfulness Practice for PreschoolersToday we will be like the tree, the wind and the sun.

Our body is like a tree. It grows, and it is strong.
Our breath is like the wind. It flows in and out.
And the sun is like the part of us that is warm and kind.

So let’s lower or close our eyes and sit tall like a tree. We extend our hands way out and stretch our fingers, like branches and leaves. Let’s squeeze our fingers together and then let go and feel them wiggle, like they are blowing in the wind.

And now, with the wind blowing, let’s be like the wind and take two big, slow breaths. Breathing in and breathing out, blowing out the wind. Breathing in and breathing out, blowing out the wind.

And now the sun comes out and warms the tree and the wind. As it shines on the tree, we feel our body. Can you feel fingers and feel your toes? What else can you feel—just by noticing? As the sun shines on the wind, we feel our body breathing. Can you feel your belly moving up and down? Can you feel the air flowing in and out of your beautiful body? With the sun up high in the sky, brightening and warming the whole world, you too can warm the world—with your kindness!

Think of someone who can use a little kindness—like your mom, dad, sister or brother. Your friend or your teacher. And as you think of them, wish for them, “May you be happy,” Mindfulness Practice for Preschoolersimagining them smiling like the sun. You deserve happiness too. So now wish for yourself, “May I be happy,” and smile like the sun.  As you smile like the sun, feel your body sitting tall like a tree and feel your breath blowing like the wind.

And then gently open your eyes and look around. You are amazing!   

Your children practicing mindfulness – enjoy!

Click here and listen to the audio of this great exercise

Click here to read the original article

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

Adapted from: WeTheParents.org

Struggling to settle on the best potty training method?

The Ultimate Guide To Potty Training!

It can certainly be an overwhelming time, and getting a child out of diapers is something that most parents just want done.

Alas, there is no magic word or step-by-step guide that will work for everyone, every time.

However…there are several battle-tested potty training approaches that we’ll break down for you in this guide. Once you know what you’re working with, it’ll be easy to cherry-pick the best bits and create a bespoke method that will work for you and your family.

POTTY TRAINING READINESS

Many parents will find themselves introducing the concept of bathroom breaks when their kiddo is between 18 and 30 months old, but that doesn’t mean you should go out of your way to start on the younger side. You could strain the relationship between you and your child by pushing her too far from her comfort zone too soon!

Good luck! Remember when you’re child is ready to be potty trained it will be simple! 

Below you will find a few videos to guide you through potty training. Enjoy!

Here is a potty training readiness checklist for you so that you know with confidence when your child is ready for potty training.

FEEL FREE TO PRINT IT UP FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE!

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAININGTHE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAININGTHE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAININGTHE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAININGTHE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

 

 

 

 

 

PREPARING FOR POTTY TRAINING   

CHOOSING YOUR APPROACH

THE NO-NONSENSE 3-DAYS AND DONE APPROACH

EARLY POTTY TRAINING

Click here to read the original article with much more information!

STEM Education – It’s Never Too Early

STEM Education – It’s Never Too Early

STEM EducationWhat is STEM?

STEM is an acronym for SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH. The STEM approach to teaching and learning integrates the curriculum content with skills of science, technology, engineering and math.

Many parents ask us what age we think it is appropriate to start teaching STEM to children. At A Children’s Carousel, we believe that it is never too early to start STEM education. Reasons are STEM Educationmany – a few being that

  • Young learners are naturally curious and questioning.
  • Early learners are natural scientists.
  • STEM education sparks a child’s interest in science, technology and math.
  • Foundations of scientific learning are inquiry and exploration; both are elements of STEM.
  • STEM encourages developmentally appropriate instruction as children explore the world around them.

STEM Education

For young children, we focus on STEM through EXPLORATION, PLAY, AND BUILDING CURIOSITY ABOUT THE NATURAL WORLD AND THE WAY THINGS WORK. For example, children learn about technology by exploring tools or simple machines and investigating how they work. These can be items they use every day like a pair of scissors, observing the wheels of a car, exploring at the park, watching a sunrise or by swimming in the ocean.

The research is quite clear that STEM education encourages the best practices in early childhood education. It shows the importance of breaking away from passive instruction to allow for more play and investigation. This kind of learning early in life builds skills, problem solving, abilities and interests that will serve children throughout their school years, and later in life. When discussing STEM-like education at home to their bi-lingual children, parents are encouraged to use both STEM Educationlanguages. In fact, research shows that bilingual children have greater mental flexibility, which may clarify math and in general many concepts.

STEM education integrated within early childhood education will tap into children’s natural curiosity and give them ample opportunities to be active participants in their own learning. Natural settings offer children almost unlimited opportunities to explore and investigate that leads to building STEM skills and creating a solid  foundation for future learning.

A Children’s Carousel is proud and privileged to have successfully incorporate STEM education into the Pre-K curriculum as well as afterschool. We encourage parents to continue this natural curious way of learning at home.

To read the original article please click here  To view more STEM related videos click here and here

Check out a few videos of our Pre-K at A Children’s Carousel engaged in STEM education!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Camp Benefits Preschoolers

Summer Camp Benefits Preschoolers

Summer Camp Benefits Preschoolers – Read Four Practical Benefits!

Adapted from Sharon Wilhelm

We’re off to a Great Start at A Children’s Carousel Summer Camp!

Enjoy this video of your kids at A Children’s Carousel Summer Camp! Click here

 

Summer Camp Benefits PreschoolersDid you know that there are many summer camp benefits preschoolers can achieve? Many Programs take children as young as 3 years old – and while this might sound too young, there are some pros to consider, especially if your child will be entering preschool or kindergarten in the fall.

1. Structure: Summer camp benefits preschoolers can gain is a provide a preview of school, particularly for children who haven’t been to daycare, according to whattoexpect.com, the official website of the bestselling book and brand What to Expect When You’re Expecting. The transition from laid-back, flexible days at home with a parent or caretaker to the relative structure of a classroom environment can be challenging. Summer camp can introduce kids to concepts like following a schedule, Summer Camp Benefits Preschoolerslearning group rules, taking responsibility for their belongings (backpack and lunchbox), and getting along with other children in a group setting.

2. Independence: Summer camp benefits preschools can also achieve is a great “practice run” for kids who don’t have a lot of experience being away from Mom and Dad. After all, being dropped off for a day full of fun and friends might seem a little less daunting for kids (and their parents) than going to the first day of school. While schools tend to have stricter policies about school drop-off, camp counselors are likely to be a bit more lenient about those first few goodbyes.

3. Skills: Summer camp benefits preschoolers in terms of introducing your preschooler to new activities and skills. Many day camps include water play or swimming lessons. Other camps may focus on specific sports, like soccer or gymnastics. Your kids will have fun while practicing important skills like teamwork, coordination, self-confidence and learning and following rules. They might even enjoy the new activity enough to continue it beyond summer camp.

Summer Camp Benefits Preschoolers4. Social: Summer camp benefits preschoolers with a wonderful opportunity to introduce your child to a whole new group of friends. Young kids sometimes have limited peer group exposure – their social circle may only include a handful of friends from daycare, a play group or their neighborhood. Summer camp, like school, allows children to practice making friends and interact with kids from diverse backgrounds. It also gives children the freedom to make friends independently, instead of just making friends based on convenience or proximity.

Help Your Child Develop Critical Thinking Skills

Help Your Child Develop Critical Thinking Skills

Critical Thinking Development and Your Child

Adapted from Caroline Duda and Parenting Magazine

critical thinking Critical thinking skills, or for that matter much of early-childhood education takes place right at home, months or years before students begin preschool. Children learn to speak and to walk, to color and to cut with scissors as well as developing their critical thinking from the individuals around them. Children develop these important thinking skills as they learn to cooperate with their peers and when they learn to read short picture books independently.

Though critical thinking is emphasized in nearly every year of school — from pre-kindergarten to college or graduate school — it is a skill that parents can begin to introduce to their children from a young age. It is even less tricky than a term like “critical thinking” might imply. Here are three ways you can foster critical thinking skills in your student:

1. ENCOURAGE QUESTIONS OF THE WORLD YOUR CHILD:“Why?” To the parents of small children, this question may seem persistent and — at times — frankly annoying. Questioning the world around her might be one of her first ventures into critical 
thinking. While it may be frustrating to hear a small voice ask, “Why?” when you tell your child to put her shoes on or to tell her what to wear in the morning, you can transform this moment into one that enriches critical thinking skills in your child. When your child asks “why?” instead of answering, you might ask, “Why do we wear shoes?” or “What do shoes protect your feet from?” Questions that begin with how, what or why are often best for these discussions with your child, as they encourage critical thinking or answers outside of “Yes,” or “No.”

2. RESIST THE URGE TO SOLVE PROBLEMS FOR YOUR CHILD:

Although we naturally jump to protecting our children and students, especially when they are distressed. However, allowing your students to solve their own problems — assuming they are not in any danger — can exercise their critical thinking muscles. An example of this can be in this scenario: you and your family are at the beach, and your child would like to build a sandcastle. Unfortunately, you forgot your shovel and bucket at home. While you could suggest that your child use a drinking cup or hands and solve the problem, challenging a child to solve the problem without your help can create an even better response. Your child may come to a solution that you had not thought of, like borrowing a bucket from the family beside you – thereby sharpening critical thinking skills. Remember to praise your child for the fabulous critical thinking answer!

critical thinking3. PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR CREATIVITY AND FREE PLAY: 

Critical thinking is closely linked to creativity and problem solving. Times of free play, also known as unstructured play, is both easy to create and is a rich source of problem solving using critical thinking. With free play, your child selects the toy to play with and allows your child to decide what to do. For example, if LEGO’s is the toy of choice allow your child to use deep thinking skills to create and build a hospital, a school or a home. These creations will increase your child’s imagination while considering what these items look like in reality. Creative activities like dance, sports, music and painting can also introduce your child to new ways of thinking, and these new ways of thinking can, in turn, will deepen critical thinking capabilities. This will lead to the ultimate educational goal; that being success in school.

To read the original article please click here 

 

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