6 Fun, Preschool Math Activities

6 Fun, Preschool Math Activities

 6 Fun, Preschool Math Activities

Math doesn’t have to be intimidating. In fact, it can actually be fun, and these six activities can help you introduce your child to many different concepts including counting, sorting, patterns, and geometric shapes. Ready to get started? Enlist the help of food, stuffed animals, socks, and more.

1. Count with food.

Snack time, dinner time, lunch-prep time — any time works for counting food! Ask your child to put five baby carrots and five apple slices on a plate for snack. Have your child add three meatballs to each family member’s dinner plate of spaghetti. And when it’s time to get tomorrow’s lunch ready, take out two containers or bags and ask your child to put two graham crackers in one, and eight cubes of cheese in the other.

2. Sort stuffed animals into groups.

What do Bob the bear and Harry the horse have in common? They’re both brown! Help your child sort stuffed animals into different groups. First, sort by color. Then, encourage your child to think about where different animals live in the wild, and sort by habitat. You can also sort by number of legs, size, tail vs. no tail, pointy ears vs. floppy ears, and more.

3. Create patterns.

Use colored blocks, plastic bears, or other small items to introduce your child to the concept of patterns. Have your child make a pile of red blocks while you make a pile of yellow. Then, lay a yellow one down on the table, ask your child to follow with red, and repeat. Explain the yellow, red, yellow, red sequence to your child and switch it up with other colors. Once you’ve got the basics down, you can move on to something a little harder, such as yellow, yellow, red, yellow, yellow, red.

4. Match socks.

Fun Preschool Math ActivitiesDo you dread the laundry-day sock pile? Ask your child to help you find each sock’s match. If you need to simplify it, start by dividing the socks into smaller piles based on who wears them. As your child goes through each pile, there might be four blue socks that look pretty similar or a slew of black socks with barely-noticeable differences. Point out the polka dots on a blue sock or draw attention to the grey stripes on a black sock…and ask your child to find the ones that match. Fun Preschool Math Activities

5. Go on a shape hunt around the house and outside.

Work with your child to draw a circle, oval, square, rectangle, triangle, diamond, star, and heart on a sheet of paper. Then, walk around your house, the backyard, the neighborhood, or a nearby park and look for these shapes in different rooms, on street signs, on houses and buildings, and in nature — and make sure to name each shape as you go.

6. Use measuring cups and spoons in the kitchen.

Fun Preschool Math ActivitiesOn your mark, get set, bake! Not only is cooking fun, it’s educational and usually results in something delicious. Start with a simple recipe, such as bread, pizza dough, cookies, or soup. Read the recipe out loud and talk about the different measurements. When it’s time to add one cup of flour or one teaspoon of salt, help your child pick out the right measuring cup and spoon and fill them up.

Whether you want to build on a concept your child is learning in preschool, your child has started asking about different shapes, or you simply need interesting ideas you can turn to during downtime, take advantage of these math activities you can do at home.

 

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Click here and enjoy this video: Counting with Lids!

Click here for many videos for you and your child to play at home!

Teaching Children Water Safety

Teaching Children Water Safety

Teaching children water safety is a key part of reducing child drownings. In Florida, drownings are one of the leading causes of child deaths.

 

teaching children water safetyThe following information is important to teach to children and reiterated through the water safety program:

  • Never go near the water without an adult.

    While swimming can be fun, it’s important for young children to know that the fun can’t begin until a “Water Watcher” is present. Once an adult is watching, summer swimming fun can start. Drowning can happen quickly and quietly, which is why actively watching your swimmer is a necessity. Even after the summer months, make sure your child knows never to go near the water alone and to always have a swimming partner.  Prevent unsupervised water access by installing barriers around your pool or hot tub and remove any pool toys that could attract children to the water.

  • Wear a life jacket.

    Life jackets should always be worn while in a boat, raft, inner tube or on a dock. If a child cannot swim or is an inexperienced swimmer, life jackets should teaching children water safetyalways be utilized while in the water. Life jackets should be properly fitted in order to keep your child’s head and face above water. Remember, life jackets only work when they are worn, so make sure your child gets in the routine of putting one on every time they get near the water. Important: As fun as water wings and inflatable toys may be, they don’t provide the same support as a U.S. Coastguard approved life jacket.

  • Learn how to swim.

    teaching children water safetySwimming lessons have been shown to reduce drowning incidents, which is why the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children ages 4 and older learn to swim. Even if your child has taken swimming lessons, never assume that their risk of drowning has subsided. Always be cautious of pool floats or toys that could interfere with your child in the water. Learning how to swim should be a fun activity, promoting aquatic awareness and minimizing intimidation. To find swimming lessons in your area, contact your local YMCA, American Red Cross, American Heart Association, city facilities, or swim school.

  • If there is an emergency, call 9-1-1 or find an adult.

    Although a child may have had swimming lessons or is utilizing a life jacket, sometimes water accidents do happen. Make sure your child knows to call for help or find an adult when trouble occurs. When watching a child swim, always make sure to have a cordless phone nearby in order to call 911 if a Teaching children water safetydangerous situation arises. Stress the importance of staying away from pool drains and suction fittings in order to have a fun, safe swimming experience.

 

Help your child learn what to do (and not to do) in and around pools and spas with a free interactive app; “The Adventures of Splish & Splash”. Available for download on Apple and Android devices from the App Store or Google Play:

Please click here to read the original article and access many resources for parents, caregivers and teachers. You will find coloring and activity sheets, videos, puppet shows and more!

Please feel free to download all or some of these resources for free!

Click here for more important resources and activities!

BELOW ARE A FEW IMPORTANT AND FUN VIDEOS!

Want to watch two watch water safety videos with your child to watch? Please click here and here!

Click here to watch an important video on summer safety and heat health.

 

6 Science Podcasts for Kids

6 Science Podcasts for Kids

6 Science Podcasts for Kids

Adapted from Bright Horizons

“Why is the sky blue?”  

“What is that plant called?”

“How can birds fly?”

“How hot is the sun?”

Sound familiar? You probably have a curious child on your hands…and you might be flooded with more science-y questions than you can answer. Let podcasts for kids help! Whether you and your child have a long commute, you’re looking for an educational weekend activity, or you simply want an alternative to screen or TV time, try these six science podcasts for kids.

ScienceBrains On

This award-winning podcast aims to encourage children’s natural curiosity of science by exploring many different topics. Co-hosted by Molly Bloom and a different child each week, Brains On features over 100 episodes and values listener participation. You can even submit your child’s questions for a chance to be added to the Brains Honor Roll. Past episode topics include fire vs. lasers, roller coasters, soil, salty snacks, cats, and how books are made and how we read them.

WOW in the World

NPR’s “podcast for curious kids and their grown-ups” dives into the “Who, What, When, Where, Why, How, and Wow in the World” of a variety of science and technology topics. WOW in the World co-hosts Guy Raz and Mindy Thomas cover something different each week — past topics range from how recess makes kids smarter, to stress-relieving video games, to cockroaches, and more.

Tumble

This science podcast for kids is designed for the whole family. Tumble co-hosts Lindsay Patterson and Marshall Escamilla focus on how science works, tell fascinating stories about scientific sciencediscoveries. For example, the STEM program that we have at A Children’s Carousel. Additionally, they teach things that go beyond what is taught in school. Recent episodes include “Hamster Versus Bacteria” and “Discover the Wildlife of Your Home.”

But Why

Here’s another NPR podcast for kids, but this one is led by kids, too. Each episode is based on children’s questions — and you and your child can even submit your own! Here are a few recent questions that host Jane Lindholm has covered: “Why do elephants have trunks? Why do giraffes have purple tongues?” “Why do days start at 12 o’clock?” and “Why do we sometimes see the moon during the day?”

The Show About Science

Not only is this a family friendly podcast  –  it is a second grader! In the Show About Science, Nate Butkus interviews a variety of guests — scientists, educators, and more — to explore fascinating topics, which, in the past, have included climate change, fake sugar, ants, food science, and sea creatures.

ScienceFun Kids Science Weekly

This science podcast for kids is produced in the UK — and it’s another one with the submit-your-child’s-question format. Each week, host Dan covers weird, cool topics that pique children’s curiosity. There’s something for everyone: from lonely frogs, flower urchins, and the T-rex of the ocean, to fire mountain, the secret life of antelopes, and the future of robots, and much more.

The next time your child stumps you with a question about science or you’re simply looking for an educational change of pace, check out these six podcasts together. Chances are you’ll both learn something new.

Click here  to read the original article

 

 

Click here to listen to a fabulous science podcast hosted by second grader Nate Butkus. There is no limit to what a child can achieve!

Preschool Children and Cognitive Development

Preschool Children and Cognitive Development

Preschool Children and Cognitive Development

Adapted from Alexandra Louis

Preschool Children During the preschool and kindergarten years, children begin to develop and learn new skills through play. Play encourages all the important areas of development. It includes social, emotional, physical, communication/language and cognitive development. This refers Preschool Childrento learning to question, problem-solve, learn about spatial relationships. In addition, they acquire knowledge through imitation, memory, number sense, classification, and symbolic play.

 

 

Cognitive Development Skills Learned During Preschool        

  • Questioning

When a child asks ‘why?’ in order to determine causes. A child asks questions to solve problems, and clarify their understanding.

  • Spatial Relationships

Exploring the spatial and physical aspects of their environment. For example, a child places a toy into a container, dumps it out and then fills up the container again with the toy.

  • Problem Solving

When children experiment, investigate, and work together with other children to problem solve. For example, when children ask questions to understand what will happen next. Preschool Children

  • Imitation

When children imitate the behaviors of those around them (e.g. other children, educators and parents). For example, when a child sticks out their tongue,  imitating another child who has done the same.

  • Memory

Beginning to differentiate between objects and people, and learn their daily routines. For example, when a child puts away their toy bin back in the same place it was on the shelf before.

  • Number Sense

A child’s understanding of number concepts (e.g. more and less) and number relationships. They begin to understand quantities, recognize relationships and understand the order of numbers. For example, singing along to ‘Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed’.

  • Classification

A child’s ability to categorize, sort, group, and connect objects. For example, sorting different colored pom poms into the same colored boxes.

  • Symbolic Play

During play, children use objects, ideas and actions to stand for other things. For example, holding a toy phone up to their ear or rocking a baby back and forth.

To read the original article please click here

 

 

 

Preschooler Reading Milestones

Preschooler Reading Milestones

Daily reading for preschoolers is a critical part of their long-term reading success!

Adapted from PBS Family

Preschooler ReadingDuring the preschool years, many young children will be able to recite or sing the alphabet. They may begin to recognize familiar letters, especially letters in their own names. Children who have been read to frequently pretend to read books to themselves or to their toy dolls and animals. They use their own words or phrases from the story.       Preschooler Reading

Here are some tips for helping younger children become readers for life.

  • Read and reread your young child’s favorite books every day. Reading books with rhymes helps develop a child’s awareness of the sounds in our language. This ability is associated with reading success in the early grades. An example is in the book “Green Eggs and Ham ”. The repetitive refrain, “I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them Sam I am.” is memorable. Young children also delight in predictable books with memorable refrains.
  • Read books with a variety of characters. All children should have the opportunity to read books with characters that look and speak like them. At the same time, children also enjoy reading stories about fantastic characters, such as talking animals. These will stimulate their imagination and build on their love of pretend play.
  • Enjoy rhyming books together. Children enjoy books with rhyming patterns. Young children find the use of nonsense rhymes playful and fun. As you read, invite your child to fill in some of the rhyming words.
  • Point out the important features of a book as you read. Before you start reading, show your child the title and author on the front of the book. For example, you might say, “The title of this book is ‘Amazing Grace’. Then say, “It is written by Mary Hoffman and the pictures are by Caroline Birch.”
  • Point to each word with your finger as you read.  This demonstrates to your child that there is a one-to-one match between the spoken and written word. Also, it also draws your child’s attention to the link between the words you say and the words on the page. Therefore, pointing as you read also reinforces the concept that we read from top to bottom and from the left to the right.
  • Use stories to introduce your child to new words. Focusing on new vocabulary words increases reading comprehension. Thereby, promoting your child’s vocabulary development by drawing his attention to new or unusual words in the story. Most importantly, just have fun with these new words and help your child use them in real-life situations. An example of this would be, after learning “capsize” in a story, you can point out that the toy boat in your child’s bath has capsized and the animals are now in the water. Preschooler Reading

Click here  to read the original article and learn more about how preschoolers develop into readers through writing

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

Adapted from: WeTheParents.org

Struggling to settle on the best potty training method?

The Ultimate Guide To Potty Training!

It can certainly be an overwhelming time, and getting a child out of diapers is something that most parents just want done.

Alas, there is no magic word or step-by-step guide that will work for everyone, every time.

However…there are several battle-tested potty training approaches that we’ll break down for you in this guide. Once you know what you’re working with, it’ll be easy to cherry-pick the best bits and create a bespoke method that will work for you and your family.

POTTY TRAINING READINESS

Many parents will find themselves introducing the concept of bathroom breaks when their kiddo is between 18 and 30 months old, but that doesn’t mean you should go out of your way to start on the younger side. You could strain the relationship between you and your child by pushing her too far from her comfort zone too soon!

Good luck! Remember when you’re child is ready to be potty trained it will be simple! 

Below you will find a few videos to guide you through potty training. Enjoy!

Here is a potty training readiness checklist for you so that you know with confidence when your child is ready for potty training.

FEEL FREE TO PRINT IT UP FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE!

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAININGTHE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAININGTHE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAININGTHE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAININGTHE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO POTTY TRAINING

 

 

 

 

 

PREPARING FOR POTTY TRAINING   

CHOOSING YOUR APPROACH

THE NO-NONSENSE 3-DAYS AND DONE APPROACH

EARLY POTTY TRAINING

Click here to read the original article with much more information!

Tips on Reading to Your Preschool Child

Tips on Reading to Your Preschool Child

The early years are critical to developing a lifelong love of reading – you can’t start reading to a child too soon!

  • Read together every day. Read to your child every day. Make this a warm and loving time when the two of you can cuddle close together. Bedtime is an especially great time for reading together. 
  • Give everything a name. You can build comprehension skills early, even with the littlest child. Play games that involve naming or pointing to objects. Say things like, “Where’s your nose?” and then, “Where’s Mommy’s nose?” Or touch your child’s nose and say, “What’s this?”
  • Say how much you enjoy reading together. Tell your child how much you enjoy reading with him or her. Look forward to this time you spend together. Talk about “story time” as the favorite part of your day.
  • Read with fun in your voice. Read to your child with humor and expression. Use different voices for different characters.
  • Know when to stop. If your child loses interest or has trouble paying attention, just put the book away for a while. Don’t continue reading if your child is not enjoying it.  Reading Preschooler
  • Be interactive. Engage your child so he or she will actively listen to a story. Discuss what’s happening, point out things on the page, and answer your child’s questions. Ask questions of your own and listen to your child’s responses.
  • Read it again and again and again. Your child will probably want to hear a favorite story over and over. Go ahead and read the same book for the 100th time! Research suggests that repeated readings help children develop language skills.
  • Talk about writing, too. Draw your child’s attention to the way writing works. When looking at a book together, point out how we read from left to right and how words are separated by spaces.
  • Point out print everywhere. Talk about the written words you see in the world around you and respond with interest to your child’s questions about words. Ask him or her to find a new word every time you go on an outing.                        

Visit our YouTube Channel! Click here 

Videos stressing the importance of reading to your child

 

STEM Education – It’s Never Too Early

STEM Education – It’s Never Too Early

STEM EducationWhat is STEM?

STEM is an acronym for SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH. The STEM approach to teaching and learning integrates the curriculum content with skills of science, technology, engineering and math.

Many parents ask us what age we think it is appropriate to start teaching STEM to children. At A Children’s Carousel, we believe that it is never too early to start STEM education. Reasons are STEM Educationmany – a few being that

  • Young learners are naturally curious and questioning.
  • Early learners are natural scientists.
  • STEM education sparks a child’s interest in science, technology and math.
  • Foundations of scientific learning are inquiry and exploration; both are elements of STEM.
  • STEM encourages developmentally appropriate instruction as children explore the world around them.

STEM Education

For young children, we focus on STEM through EXPLORATION, PLAY, AND BUILDING CURIOSITY ABOUT THE NATURAL WORLD AND THE WAY THINGS WORK. For example, children learn about technology by exploring tools or simple machines and investigating how they work. These can be items they use every day like a pair of scissors, observing the wheels of a car, exploring at the park, watching a sunrise or by swimming in the ocean.

The research is quite clear that STEM education encourages the best practices in early childhood education. It shows the importance of breaking away from passive instruction to allow for more play and investigation. This kind of learning early in life builds skills, problem solving, abilities and interests that will serve children throughout their school years, and later in life. When discussing STEM-like education at home to their bi-lingual children, parents are encouraged to use both STEM Educationlanguages. In fact, research shows that bilingual children have greater mental flexibility, which may clarify math and in general many concepts.

STEM education integrated within early childhood education will tap into children’s natural curiosity and give them ample opportunities to be active participants in their own learning. Natural settings offer children almost unlimited opportunities to explore and investigate that leads to building STEM skills and creating a solid  foundation for future learning.

A Children’s Carousel is proud and privileged to have successfully incorporate STEM education into the Pre-K curriculum as well as afterschool. We encourage parents to continue this natural curious way of learning at home.

To read the original article please click here  To view more STEM related videos click here and here

Check out a few videos of our Pre-K at A Children’s Carousel engaged in STEM education!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Ways to Teach Kids PATIENCE!

Three Ways to Teach Kids PATIENCE!

Teach kTeach Kids Patienceids patience…three easy ways?

If your child wasn’t born to wait, you’re not alone. Good news is that patience is actually a skill you can teach. Teach Kids Patience

As mom’s and dad’s of young children, have you ever wondered if it’s possible to teach your toddler patience? First time parents, this will help you immensely in the years to come. For parents-of-a-few who really needs to teach this lesson, don’t worry, you’re covered too. Remember, building patience takes time and discipline not just for them, but for you too.

Does this seem impossible and easier said than done? Have no fear with consistency and determination it can be done – and it’s worth the effort!

The video below provides three simple and fun ways that you can do to teach kids patience! Enjoy!

Want to watch this video and others on YouTube? click here and here

Tips for Handling the First Days of Preschool

Tips for Handling the First Days of Preschool

Tips for Handling the First Days of Preschool

Adapted from whattoexpect.com

TIPS TO MAKE THE FIRST DAYS OF PRESCHOOL AND THE DAYS AND WEEKS AHEAD A GREAT EXPERIENCE FOR YOUR LITTLE ONE AND FOR YOU

First Days PreschoolTIP 1: DON’T RUSH THROUGH THE MORNING.

Get everyone up at a reasonable hour so that you won’t have to hurry your child through breakfast or risk being late. After all, no one likes to race through the school morning routine – especially on the first days.

TIP 2: ARRIVE FASHIONABLY EARLY.

This way, your little one can slowly settle in before the real action starts. He’ll also get more face time with the teacher – which will be tougher to do once all the other kids are there.

TIP 3: BRING A COMFORT OBJECT.

If the preschool allows it, let your child bring along her favorite stuffed animal (or blanket, or whatever object does the trick) so the new setting doesn’t feel so scary. Before long, your child will feel comfortable, allowing her teacher to put the comfort object to the side.

TIP 4: PUT ON A HAPPY FACE.

Anxiety may be eating you up inside, but don’t let your child see it because nerves are highly contagious. When your child sees that you’re upbeat and you look confident – the transition from home to preschool will be smooth and he will feel upbeat and excited too.

TIP 5: HANG AROUND, BUT DON’T HOVER.

Many preschools let (or even encourage that) parents stay in the classroom for all or part of the first few days. If this is allowed, try to stay a bit – keeping a distance away from your child allowing her to explore her new surroundings. Your goal is to let the teacher take over so you can get on with your day.  First Days Preschool

TIP 6: KEEP GOOD-BYES SHORT AND SWEET.

When it’s time for you to make an exit, hold back your tears a little longer (smile!) give your new preschooler a hug, and let him know when you’ll be back (“I’ll pick you up after lunch” or whenever you plan on picking her up). Then leave and don’t linger because he can’t get on with his day until you do. Finally, no matter how tempting, never sneak out when your preschooler is looking the other way as it will make him feel insecure and less trusting.

First Days PreschoolJust remember, it’s common for kids to have a difficult time separating, however chances are she’ll be fine five minutes after you walk out the door. If it’s taking a while for your little one to adjust, don’t panic – our preschool teachers and their assistants have seen it all and they know just what to do, so ask his teacher for help. You’ll be pleasantly surprised at pickup seeing your child very happy and busy!

To read the original article click here

To watch a video click here

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